Rihard Jakopič - View of Oroslavje (idyllic panorama) - 2 drawings

Jakopič's drawings are usually unsigned, difficult to classify over time, and are rarely conceived as stand-alone drawings. The vast majority are study and preparatory. Studies, especially landscape studies, are carried out in later years with greater mental concentration, are topographically recognizable and complete in themselves. However, compositional designs prevail, which...
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Jakopič Rihard

Drawing

Jakopič's drawings are usually unsigned, difficult to classify over time, and are rarely conceived as stand-alone drawings. The vast majority are study and preparatory. Studies, especially landscape studies, are carried out in later years with greater mental concentration, are topographically recognizable and complete in themselves. However, compositional designs prevail, which are usually only rough but normatively defined ideas and can be described as preparatory. It is most reliable to define them by motives. They are easy to connect with derived images. For executed figural paintings, there are usually several studies of details and / or the whole. Jakopič always looked at drawing in a distinctly painterly way and arranged the whole by arranging light and dark parts. The present landscape is one of four studies from Oroslavje, where Jakopič lived for a few weeks in 1929, now called the Textile Factory (NG S 2507) for a large painting. It is a studio synthesis of field studies in which he prepared a composition in oil. He is no longer interested in objective data from experiential notes, as he changes certain relationships arbitrarily without consistently deriving a change of purgatory. In this drawing, he generalized the already defined basic elements of the panoramic image. He removed the contrast between the open form of the foreground and the detail of the silhouette of the settlement with the factory. By stamping, he emphasized the foreground, which thus became a spatial thrust, and added a shepherd to the cow herd, as if modeled on the construction of a landscape space by 17th-century masters. He raised the clearing so that a panoramic view could be seen from a height. The drawing is properly trimmed and glued with gray cardboard along with no. I. It comes from Jakopič's legacy and is documented in the National Gallery among the drawings that the heirs kept when selling most of the painter's legacy in 2012 and 2013 (Dr. Andrej Smrekar).

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  Height (cm) Lenght (cm)
 Dimensions 13 34
 Dimensions with frame Passe-partout: 45 55 

Around 1929

Drawing

Graphite on paper

Landscape

Jakopič's drawings are usually unsigned, difficult to classify over time, and are rarely conceived as stand-alone drawings. The vast majority are study and preparatory. Studies, especially landscape studies, are carried out in later years with greater mental concentration, are topographically recognizable and complete in themselves. However, compositional designs prevail, which are usually only rough but normatively defined ideas and can be described as preparatory. It is most reliable to define them by motives. They are easy to connect with derived images. For executed figural paintings, there are usually several studies of details and / or the whole. Jakopič always looked at drawing in a distinctly painterly way and arranged the whole by arranging light and dark parts. The present landscape is one of four studies from Oroslavje, where Jakopič lived for a few weeks in 1929, now called the Textile Factory (NG S 2507) for a large painting. It is a studio synthesis of field studies in which he prepared a composition in oil. He is no longer interested in objective data from experiential notes, as he changes certain relationships arbitrarily without consistently deriving a change of purgatory. In this drawing, he generalized the already defined basic elements of the panoramic image. He removed the contrast between the open form of the foreground and the detail of the silhouette of the settlement with the factory. By stamping, he emphasized the foreground, which thus became a spatial thrust, and added a shepherd to the cow herd, as if modeled on the construction of a landscape space by 17th-century masters. He raised the clearing so that a panoramic view could be seen from a height. The drawing is properly trimmed and glued with gray cardboard along with no. I. It comes from Jakopič's legacy and is documented in the National Gallery among the drawings that the heirs kept when selling most of the painter's legacy in 2012 and 2013 (Dr. Andrej Smrekar).

Unsigned.

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